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Sussex Community Corrections Center

William Oettel, Warden
Ernest McBroom, Deputy Warden

The Sussex Community Corrections Center (SCCC) consists of the following components:

  • The Crest Substance Abuse Treatment Program
  • The Sussex Work Release Center
  • Sussex Violation of Probation Center
The Sussex Community Corrections Center is located in Georgetown, Delaware. Each facility and program is classified as Level IV (4). Sussex currently accommodates male and female offenders in each of its programs.

Crest
For more information, please visit Crest.

Sussex Work Release Center
Work Release is a transition program for offenders preparing to live in the community full-time. Work release is a program in which offenders seek employment, attend outside medical appointments and participate in mandated treatment programs. Offenders return to the facility at night to sleep. An offender can be ordered by a court to participate in work release or can be classified to the program by the Department. Some offenders come to work release after a prison stay. Some come directly from the community.

Offenders normally stay in work release less than one year with the average stay of four to six months. Work release offenders typically work for private employers and participate in treatment and educational programs. Department officials must approve employers. Random substance abuse testing is mandatory for all offenders and continues throughout their stay at SWRC. Offenders must display pro-social behaviors such as honesty, responsibility, and accountability. While employed full-time, offenders must pay a $25 a week room and board fee and pay $25 toward any court obligations that have been imposed.

Sussex Violation of Probation (SVOP)
Sussex Violation of Probation Center (SVOP) is a 250-bed Level IV (4) facility in Georgetown. SVOP houses male and female offenders separately. SVOP houses primarily offenders who have violated the terms of their probation. These "rule breakers" have not committed any crimes during their probation in the community. They have committed "technical" violations that could include failing to report to their probation officer, changing residence without notifying their probation officer, failing a drug test or failing to abide by a curfew.

The Department believes such violations warrant brief periods of incarceration. SVOP provides a military-style, highly regimented program of discipline, behavior modification and community service in a stark, no-frills environment. Offenders rise daily at 5 a.m. for community service or institutional assignments. Work includes maintaining their personal living space, cleaning the common areas of the facility and working in the kitchen. Offenders also participate in community service projects that benefit towns, churches, non-profit organizations, American Legions, senior and recreation centers, schools and cemeteries.

Time spent at SVOP gives offenders a chance to adjust their attitudes and change their behaviors so they are better able to abide by the terms of their probation once released back to the community. SVOP keeps violators from being returned to a prison population where more serious offenders are housed, which frees up higher security beds for more serious offenders.

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